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All things related to Rome, both historical and fictional.

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(via alswearengen)
synnecrosisofsolace:

'Death of Messalina'Oil on canvas, c. 1704by Francesco Solimena Messalina enters history with a reputation as a ruthless, predatory and sexually insatiable Roman Empress. When the Emperor Claudius was informed that she had gone so far as to marry her latest lover, the Senator Gaius Silius, he ordered her death. Messalina was offered the choice of suicide, but too frightened to stab herself she was killed by the arresting officer.

synnecrosisofsolace:

'Death of Messalina'
Oil on canvas, c. 1704
by Francesco Solimena 

Messalina enters history with a reputation as a ruthless, predatory and sexually insatiable Roman Empress. When the Emperor Claudius was informed that she had gone so far as to marry her latest lover, the Senator Gaius Silius, he ordered her death. Messalina was offered the choice of suicide, but too frightened to stab herself she was killed by the arresting officer.


(via synnecrosisofsolace)

(via tanya852)

tanya852:

"In his fifty-six years he was at times many things, including a fugitive, prisoner, rising politician, army leader, legal advocate, rebel, dictator – perhaps even a god – as well as a husband, father, lover and adulterer. Few fictional heroes have ever done as much as Caius Julius Caesar." - Adrian Goldsworthy


(via alswearengen)

Rome -s01e05 - audio commentary by Ray Stevenson

(Source: vorobey008)


(via haru-mejiro)

haru-mejiro:

Statue of Agrippina Minor 

Perhaps recut from a statue of Messalina.

Marble. From Herculaneum, 41-59 CE.

Naples, Museo Archeologico Nazionale

Source: Flickr / dandiffendale

lionofchaeronea:

Theseus abandons Ariadne on Naxos.  Fresco from the house of Lucius Caecilius Iucundus, Pompeii; now in the National Archaeological Museum, Naples.

lionofchaeronea:

Theseus abandons Ariadne on Naxos.  Fresco from the house of Lucius Caecilius Iucundus, Pompeii; now in the National Archaeological Museum, Naples.


(via lionofchaeronea)

"The Latin phrase libra pondo was used in ancient Rome to indicate weight, which is why today the abbreviation for “pound” is “lb.”"


(via nutzoidnews)
sasalvete:

This is a picture of Caesar leading his troops in Gaul. We studied Caesar’s involvement in the conquest of Gaul through his poem De Bello Gallico - Daniel

sasalvete:

This is a picture of Caesar leading his troops in Gaul. We studied Caesar’s involvement in the conquest of Gaul through his poem De Bello Gallico - Daniel


(via sasalvete)